Posts Tagged ‘veil’

As what kind of entity does Islam envisage Woman? Does it consider her the equal of man  in terms of dignity and the respect accorded to her, or is she thought of as belonging to an inferior species? This is the question which we now wish to answer.

 The particular philosophy of Islam concerning family rights:

 Islam has a particular philosophy concerning the family rights of men and women which is contrary to what has been going on in the last fourteen centuries and with what is actually happening now. Islam does not believe in one kind of right, one kind of duty and one kind of punishment for both men and women in every instance. It considers one set of rights and duties and punishments more appropriate for men, and one set more appropriate for women. As a result on some occasions Islam has taken a similar position as regards both women and men, and on other occasions different positions.

 Why is that so and what is its basis? Is. that why Islam, also, like many other religions, has derogatory views concerning women and has considered woman to be of an inferior species, or does it have some other reasons and another philosophy?

 You may have heard repeatedly in the speeches, lectures and writings of the followers of western ideas that they consider Islamic laws concerning dowry, maintenance, divorce and polygyny, and other laws like them, as being contemptuous of, and insulting to, the female sex. In this way they try to create the impression that those provisions only prove that man alone has been favoured.

 They say that all the rules and laws in the world before the twentieth century were based upon the notion that man, due to his sex, is a nobler being than woman, and that woman was created simply for the benefit and use of man. Islamic rights also revolve in this same orbit of man’s interest and benefit.

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Veil & beneficial effects

Posted: January 5, 2009 in Love
Tags: , ,

 

 

The Science Behind The Veil

here are number of health and moral benefits that wearing the veil can provide.

 The moral duty of wearing the veil in Islam is an often discussed topic among Muslim women. However, little has been written about scientific reasons that the veil is beneficial for society. There are, in fact, a number of health benefits that wearing the veil can provide, as well as many behavioral science studies that suggest that the veil is the best attire (clothes) for women.

 

These texts attribute the common cold to wind elements entering the body and causing the typical symptoms of sneezing and a Runny nose.

 

All outdoor workers should wear some sort of head covering:

For this reason, protecting the head is even more important in warm weather. V.G. Rocine, a prominent brain research specialist, has found that brain Phosphorus melts at 108 degrees; a temperature that can be easily reached if one stays under the hot sun for any length of time without a head covering. When this happens, irreversible brain damage, memory loss and loss of some brain functions can result. Although this example is extreme, Brain damage can still be measured in small degrees from frequent exposure to and overheating of the head. Bernard Jensen, a naturopath and chiropractor states that this is because the brain runs on the mineral phosphorus, which is very affected by heat.

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Hygienic Purposes:

All public should wear a veil or head-covering workers serving society to ensure cleanliness and purity. Workers in a number of professions wear “veils” – nurses, fast food workers, and deli Counter workers, restaurant workers and servers, doctors, health care providers and many more.

In fact, when we compare the number of workers who cover their heads to the number who do not, we find that more people probably cover their heads than do not.

Female Psychological Balance:

Covering the hair can also have a beneficial effect on the female psyche as well.

 Studies of women being interviewed for jobs show that there is a high correlation between what they wear and their perceptions of how successful they will be in their interviews. There are many more examples of how what we wear can influence how we act.

Wearing a veil can serve to remind women of their religious duties and behavioral expectations. It can also serve as a reminder to women that we are not only individuals, but also representatives and diplomats of our “Ummah.”

veil dress islamic dress

By: Martyr Ayatollah Murtuda Mutahhari

The fact is that the covering or its new expression, hijab, is not concerned with whether or not it is good for a woman to appear in society covered or uncovered . The point is whether or not a woman and a man’s need of her should be a limitless, free association or not.

Should a man have the right to satisfy his needs with every woman and in every place short of committing adultery?

Islam, which looks at the spirit of the problem, answers: No. Men are only allowed to satisfy their sexual desires with their legal wives within a marital situation based upon the laws of marriage which establish a series of heavy commitments. It is forbidden for men to have any physical relations with women they are not related to by marriage.

It is true that the question externally appears to be, “What should a woman do?” Must she leave her home covered or uncovered? That is, the person about whom the question is raised is a woman and the question is often expressed in very heart-rending tones, “Is it better for a woman to be free or condemned and imprisoned in the modest dress?” But something else lies at the root of the question. That is, should men be free to take sexual benefit from women in any way they choose short of committing adultery or not? That is, the one who benefits here is a man and not a woman or at least a man benefits more than a woman does. As Will Durant has said, “The mini-skirt is a blessing for everyone in the world except cloth merchants.”

So the depth of the question is whether or not the seeking of sexual pleasure should be limited to the family environment and legal wives or is the freedom of seeking sexual fulfillment something that should be satisfied in society at large? Islam defends the first theory. According to Islamic precepts, limiting sexual desires to the family environment and legal wives helps to maintain the mental health of the society. It strengthens the relationships between the members of the family and fosters the development of a perfect harmony between a husband and wife. As far as society is concerned, it keeps and preserves energies to be then used for social activities and it causes a woman to attain a higher position in the eyes of man.

The philosophy of the Islamic ‘covering’ depends on several things. Some of them are psychological and some relate to the home and the family. Others have sociological roots and some of them relate to raising the dignity of a woman and preventing her debasement.The modest dress in Islam is rooted in a more general and basic issue. That is, Islamic precepts aim at limiting all kinds of sexual enjoyment to the family and the marital environment within the bounds of marriage so that society is only a place for work and activity. It is opposite of the Western system of the present era which mixes work with sexual enjoyment. Islam separates these two environments completely.

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Bible verses regarding head covering or Hijab. It clearly states that the woman needs to cover up her hair.

King James Bible CORINTHIANS 11:1-18

11:1 Be ye followers of me, even as I also am of Christ.
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11:2 Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you.
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11:3 But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God.
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11:4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head.
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11:5 But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven.
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11:6 For if the woman be not covered, let her also be shorn: but if it be a shame for a woman to be shorn or shaven, let her be covered.
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11:7 For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man.
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11:8 For the man is not of the woman: but the woman of the man.
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11:9 Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man.
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11:10 For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head because of the angels.
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11:11 Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the man, in the Lord.
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11:12 For as the woman is of the man, even so is the man also by the woman; but all things of God.
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11:13 Judge in yourselves: is it comely that a woman pray unto God uncovered?
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11:14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?
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11:15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering.
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11:16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God.
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11:17 Now in this that I declare unto you I praise you not, that ye come together not for the better, but for the worse
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11:18 For first of all, when ye come together in the church, I hear that there be divisions among you; and I partly believe it.

Dear brother and sister Muslim or non Muslim let us know your views about these verses of Bible. The comment box is underneath so that you can type your views.

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A Real Story: How I became a ?

In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful

Name: Sara Nevarez

From: Los Angeles, California

Salam Aleikom (Hi)

My name is Sara Nevarez and I am Muslim (alhamdullilah). I was born in to a strong catholic family who came from Mexico to America, my family was very traditional, my grandmothers would take me to church on Sundays and they showed me how to pray, my mother would teach me to show respect for the prophet Issa (as), and father would read the bible

As I grew older I had many questions, I asked my father the prophet Issa (as), needed to sleep, eat, and drink, if he was the son of Allah (swt), and my father had no answer for me. I asked my grandmothers why Catholics prayed to saints if they were not perfect in their lives and both of them had no answer. When I grew older I stopped going to church because I felt nothing in my heart for the catholic beliefs, my family was sad for me

In 1998 I decided to go back to church, all the questions I had were still there and so I asked the priest because I was sure he would know everything. I told him I had doubts about prophet issa (as) being the son of Allah (swt) and he said to me “you have to accept this and not ask questions”…, on that day my heart felt empty and heavy. I knew my life was lost without religion, but it was better to be lost than to not be 100% convinced of your faith. And I wan not convinced at all.

In 2000 I saw the story of Yusuf Islam on American television, he told of all the riches he had when he was a famous singer yet he still felt loneliness and not fulfilled… after an accident someone gave him the noble Koran and he went on to describe the immediate feeling of relief upon reading the first pages. He said this life was meaningless without Islam. He also said he would never go back… I remember thinking to myself that man had everything but felt like he had nothing without spiritual guidance OH,OH

I wanted to know more about this religion called Islam I bought books many books, I bought the movie (the message) and I went to internet to learn everything I could. I knew Islam was for me the noble and holy Koran made perfect sense it is completely logical… the Koran showed me how to live to accept to respect, strive towards Allah (swt), I studied for two years. I wanted to be sure of the differences between Shia and Sunnah, for me I accept both but I wanted to know how both were in their Islam, I went to Sunnah Masjid “Mosque” no one wanted to discuss this subject, in my mind I had to find out

One day I met a woman from south Lebanon, she went to my office and I could not keep my eyes from her, we became friends…, she took me to Shia Masjid (Mosque) and I read two books, TEARS & TRIBUTES and THE IZ INFALLIBLES. My eyes were filled with hot tears and my heart was happy and sad, I knew immediately I was ready for my life to change I wanted Allah (swt) to love me

On may 05- 2002,at 4:44 in the afternoon I declared Al_shahadah (Ashhado an la ilaha ella Allah, Mohamed Rasul Allah) and submitted to Allah (swt) I became muhajabeh (I wore the Veil) that day, I prayed in the direction of the kaabbah (Kiblah) for the first time on that day and I cried on that day I was crying because of sadness, why I didn’t find this religion of Islam sooner ?, I was lost for a long time “subhanallah I found Islam like Yusuf Islam ” and I too would never go back never…, my son Hassan was 12 years old in 2002 and he too became Muslim. My family was happy that I had religion and they accepted Islam in the family.

In 2006 performed hajj and I feel stronger than ever. my life and the life of my son have changed forever, Islam showed me that without submission to the one god life is a meaningless day to day existence Allah(swt),in all of his mercy, has put forth the Koran through his Rasul Mohamed (sas) so that we humanity, may inshallah be guided, I hope in all sincerity that this humble story of a woman’s conversion to Shia Islam will inspire all those who read it, may Allah(swt) blessings be bestowed upon all of my brother and sisters

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Hi every one:
I put some useful links for you to research about Islamic Veil (Hijab).
I hope it will help you. also you can leave your comment to me.

  1. Disorted image of Muslim Women
  2. International and Minority Law in Regard to Muslim Minority Groups / Seyyed Mustafa Mir Muhammadi
  3. Woman In Bible & Quran
  4. Aurora of Love
  5. Canadian Muslim Women: Balance between Life and Work / Fazil Larijani
  6. Hijab, a Modern Day Necessity / Unknown
  7. Hijab (Veil) and Muslim Women / Ms. Naheed Mustafa
  8. Hijab (Islamic Cover for Women) / Ahmad Luqmani
  9. Hijab: How It Protects and Benefits Women and Society / Unknown
  10. Chastity Is a Human Virtue
  11. Two Concepts Regarding the Hijab of a Woman
  12. Niqab, Deviation In The Issue Of Hijab / Mahnaz Badoran/Nahid Rampanahi
  13. Woman In Islam / B. Aisha Lemu/Fatima Heeren
  14. Exposé of the Year: ‘The Marketing of Evil’
  15. Tips for Beginning to Wear Hijab
  16. The Veil
  17. The Islamic Dress Code / Khalid Baig
  18. Hijab, Immunity Not Limitation
  19. Hijab In The Qur’an / Syed Burhan Mehdi
  20. The Tragedy Of Western Women /
  21. Top Ten Excuses of Muslim Women Who Don’t Wear Hijab / Dr. Huwayda Ismaeel
  22. Do Muslim Women Have Rights?
  23. The Science Behind the Veil (Hijab)
  24. Muslim Women and the Islamic Family Structure
  25. Criteria of Spouse Selection / Ali Akbar Mazaheri
  26. THE REAL VISAGE OF THE HIJAB / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  27. THE WORD ‘HIJAB’ / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  28. The Participation of Women in Meetings and Gatherings / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  29. The Islamic Hijab – Part V / Murtaza Mutahhari
  30. The Islamic Hijab – Part IV / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  31. The Islamic Hijab – Part III / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  32. The Islamic Hijab – Part II / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  33. The Islamic Hijab – Part I / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  34. Reasons Given for the Development of the Hijab – Part II / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  35. Reasons Given for the Development of the Hijab – Part I / MURTAZA MUTAHHARI
  36. THE DUTIES OF WOMEN / Ayatullah Ibrahim Amini
  37. The Modest Covering and Woman’s Chasteness / Husayn Ansarian
  38. Daughters of Another Path: women Becoming Muslim in America / Carol L. Anway
  39. FATIMA (SA) THE JASMINE OF MEDINA / Hoda Lezgee
  40. Unwelcome Sisters? An Analysis of findings from a Study of How Muslim Women (and Muslim Men)Experience University / Christine Asmar ,Elizabeth Proude ,Lici Inge
  41. US Muslim Firewoman Allowed to Observe Hijab
  42. Hijab of Freedom / Kubra Saiyeda Jafri
  43. Status Of Women In Islam / Dr. Ahmed Abdul Magid Hammoud
  44. “STATUS OF WOMEN” AS SEEN FROM THE QUR’AN / Kashif Ahmed Shehzada
  45. Question of Hijab: Suppression or Liberation? / Mary C. Ali
  46. Muslim Women Should Be Both Pure and Educated / Farizah Shaheedah from Malaysia
  47. Marriage and Education – Where Should Our Priorities Be? (part 1) / By: Munir Daya, Dar-es-Salaam
  48. LIBERATION BY THE VEIL / Sehmina Jaffer Chopra
  49. Does Equality Lie In Hijab, Or In Uncovered? / Raziya Menon
  50. LOVE, SEXUAL DISCIPLINE AND CHASTITY (Democratic Morality, Love in Personality Growth)Part One / By Martyr Morteza Mutahhari
  51. A Guiding Light for All Women
  52. A Japanese Woman’s Experience of Hijaab / Nakata Khaula
  53. The Beauty of ISLAM THE VEIL:Beauty in the eyes of the beholder / Sarah Hussein Shah, Ali Rahim
  54. WEARING HIJAB: VEIL OF VALOR / EMILIA ASKARI
  55. Hijab – symbol of muslim women’s rejection of western corruption / Muneera Afifa
  56. The culture of nakedness and the nakedness of culture / Gholam Ali Haddad Adel
  57. Message of Hejab from A Muslim Woman
  58. Women on Display / Abdullah Osman

Modesty and chastity , very important ideologies with Islam, are achieved by prescribing standards on behavior and the dress of a Muslim. A woman who adheres to the tenements of Islam is required to follow the dress code called Hijab, other synonymes are Veil, Purdah, or just Covering. It is an act of faith and establishes a Muslim’s life with honor, respect and dignity. The Hijab is viewed as a liberation for women, in that the covering brings about “an aura of respect” (Takim, 22) and women are recognized as individuals who are admired for their mind and personality, “not for their beauty or lack of it” ( Mustafa ) and not as sex objects.

Contrary to popular belief, the covering of the Muslim woman is not oppression but a liberation from the shackles of male scrutiny and the standards of attractiveness. In Islam, a woman is free to be who she is inside, and immuned from being portrayed as sex symbol and lusted after. Islam exalts the status of a woman by commanding that she “enjoys equal rights to those of man in everything, she stands on an equal footing with man” (Nadvi, 11) and both share mutual rights and obligations in all aspects of life.

Men and women though equal are not identical, and each compliments the other in the different roles and functions that they are responsible to. “From an Islamic perspective, to view a woman as a sex symbol is to denigrate her. Islam believes that a woman is to be judged by her [virtuous] character and actions rather than by her looks or physical features” (Takim, 22). In the article, “My Body Is My Own Business”, Ms. Naheed Mustafa , a young Canadian born and raised, university-educated Muslim woman writes,
She goes on to say,

Muslims believe that God gave beauty to all women, but that her beauty is not be seen by the world, as if the women are meat on the shelf to be picked and looked over. When she covers herself she puts herself on a higher level and men will look at her with respect and she is noticed for her intellect, faith, and personality, not for her beauty. In many societies, especially in the West, women are taught from early childhood that their worth is proportional to their attractiveness and are compelled to follow the male standards of beauty and abstract notions of what is attractive, half realizing that such pursuit is futile and often humiliating (Mustafa).

Chastity, modesty, and piety are promoted by the institution of veiling. “The hijab in no way does not prevent a woman from playing her role as an important individual in a society nor does it make her inferior.” (Takim,22)

A Muslim woman may wear whatever she pleases in the presence of her husband and family or among women friends. But when she goes out or when men other than her husband or close family are present she is expected to wear a dress which will cover [her hair and] all parts of her body, and not reveal her figure. What a contrast with Western fashions which every year concentrate quite intentionally on exposing yet another erogenous zone to the public gaze! The intention of Western dress is to reveal the figure, while the intention of Muslim dress is to conceal [and cover] it, at least in public (Lemu,25).

The Muslim woman does not feel the pressures to be beautiful or attractive, which is so apparent in the Western and Eastern cultures. She does not have to live up to expectations of what is desirable and what is not. Superficial beauty is not the Muslim woman’s concern; her main goal is inner spiritual beauty. She does not have to use her body and charms to get recognition or acceptance in society. It is very different from the cruel methods that other societies subject women, in that their worth is always judged by their physical appearance. There are numerous examples of discrimination at the workplace where women are either accepted or rejected, because of their attractiveness and sex appeal.

Another benefit of adorning the veil is that it is a protection for women. Muslims believe that when women
display their beauty to everybody, they degrade themselves by becoming objects of sexual desire and become vulnerable to men, who look at them as “gratification for the sexual urge”(Nadvi,8). The Hijab makes them out as women belonging to the class of modest chaste women, so that transgressors and sensual men may recognize them as such and dare not tease them out of mischief” (Nadvi, 20). Hijab solves the problem of sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances, which is so demeaning for women, when men get mixed signals and believe that women want their advances by the way they reveal their bodies.

Women in so many societies are just treated as sex symbols and nothing more than just a body who “display themselves to get attention” (Mustafa). A good example is in advertising, where a woman’s body is used to sell products. Women are constantly degraded, and subjected to reveal more and more of themselves. .

The Covering sanctifies her and forces society to hold her in high esteem. Far from humiliating the woman, Hijab actually grants the woman an aura of respect, and bestows upon her a separate and unique identity (Takim, 22). According to the Qu’ran, the same high standards of moral conduct are for men as it is for women. Modesty is essential in a man’s life, as well, whether it be in action, morals or speech. Islam also commands proper behavior and dress of men, in that they are not allowed to make a wanton show of their bodies to attract attention onto themselves, and they too must dress modestly. They have a special commandment to lower their eyes, and not to brazenly stare at women.

In Sura Nur of the Holy Qu’ran it says,
Many of the misconceptions of the Muslim woman in the west, particularly her veil stems from Arab and Muslim countries that have deviated from the true doctrines of Islam, and have ” mixed up Islamic principles with pre-Islamic pagan traditions” (Bahnassawi, 67)

In this present period of decline from Islam, many Muslim women are alienated, isolated from social life, and are oppressed by Muslim men and rulers who use the name of religion for their injustices. (Bahnassawi, 65) In this instance, the Hijab is used as a means of keeping many Muslim women away from society, with the misconception that it signifies isolation and weakness. But as many Muslim women come back into the fold of the untainted and true Islam, they are able to recognize the injustice of men who have for so long stripped them of their rights to be an integral part of society and “deserving the same dignity, honor, progress and prosperity as the men” (Nadvi,26).

Women regaining their true identity and role in society, are now wearing Hijab and embracing its concept of liberation for women, and are taking their rightful places that Islam had endowed upon them fourteen hundred years ago.

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Works Cited:
” Bahnassawi, El Salem. Woman Between Islam and World Legislations. Trans. Abdul Fattah El-Shaer. Kuwait: Dar ul Qalam, 1985.
” Lemu, Aisha and Fatima Heeren. Woman in Islam. England: Islamic COE, 1978.
” Mustafa, Naheed. “My Body is My Own Business.” Shia International. Oct. 1993: 29.
” Nadvi, Mohammad. Modesty and Chastity in Islam. Kuwait: Islamic Bk, 1982.
” Takim, Liyakatali. “The Islamic and Muslim View of Women.” Shia International. Oct. 1993: 22.